Dr. Oz and the Ruby Slippers

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I really wish Dr Oz would just put on his ruby slippers and go home. Just click those heels three times and retire.

That may sound harsh, and I usually don’t make such blanket statements, but honestly, he’s starting to do some real damage.

Like Oprah, when Dr. Oz speaks, millions of people listen. His level of influence in the average North American household has become almost iconic. Millions turn to him for advice. That would be a good thing if he was a health professional with integrity and his advice was backed by science. The reality is quite the opposite. Here’s my beef with Oz.

Dr. Oz puts profit before people.

When Dr. Oz first started out on Oprah, his information and health recommendations were fairly standard, typical of your family doctor with some Hollywood spin. Over the years, however, he has become more “Hollywood”and less “doctor”. He sensationalizes medicine, often offering quick fixes with unproven therapy. It makes for great sound bites (like the un-workout workout) and it sells, but it’s not based on science. In fact, coming soon is his own product line of unproven supplements. It doesn’t matter that he lacks the science to back up his claims. His name sells and so will his unproven products.

His advice can be dangerous

Diabetes can be prevented with vinegar and coffee. Really? If that were true, I know many of my patients would be reaching for more pie; just add a cup of coffee and it’s all good. Instead, what is proven by science is that weight management and good nutrition can delay Type 2 Diabetes.
If a person needs to lose weight to reduce their risk of having a heart attack or stroke and Dr. Oz says all they have to do is take white kidney bean pills and they can eat all the cake they want…that’s dangerous.
How about having a doctor on his show that believes cancer can be cured with baking soda? Not kidding.

Dr. Oz presents “Pseudo-Science” as fact

Pseudo-science is presenting a claim or belief as scientifically valid without having the scientific supporting evidence. Here’s what we mean by science:

What we mean by “science” is simply rigorous methods of observation. Good science looks at all the evidence (rather than cherry picking only favorable evidence), controls for variables so we can identify what is actually working, uses blinded observations so as to minimize the effects of bias, and uses internally consistent logic. Steven Novella, MD

Are there some studies showing coffee has an effect on diabetes risk? Yes. Can we use these studies to make sweeping statements that affect people’s health? No. That would be irresponsible. All that is proven by a few small studies is that more studies in that area need to be done.

Dr.Oz takes “bad science” or limited science and presents it as fact. That’s irresponsible.

I’ve been in health care long enough to see really good studies point to facts that we incorporate into our practices as health care professionals. But 10 years later (after more studies with larger numbers of people, going on for a longer time), the original studies are proven to be misleading or even point to the opposite conclusion. Studies need to be examined with the eye of a sceptic and there is a science in itself to evaluating the strength and validity of scientific studies.

When people come to me with health concerns looking for advice, they are in essence sharing a trust. Patients expect me to be honest and to have their best interest at heart. They expect that my advice will be based on scientific evidence, not on anecdotes, popularity or profit. Patients should expect that from all their health providers.

Dr. Oz fails on all fronts. So, Dr. Oz, if the ruby slippers don’t fit, perhaps you can take the job of the original Oz behind the curtain. After all, he was a charlatan too.

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One comment on “Dr. Oz and the Ruby Slippers

  1. patersont says:

    Look at you go, stirring the pot! But you are completely correct. His name sells -part of me believes each radio clip I hear of his. Just, luckily, I’m smart enough to be a skeptic when some content sounds more like an old-wives tale than scientific fact.

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